Tag Archives: longevity

Total hip replacement Pt 1

On Wed, August 22nd 2018 I had a total left hip replacement conducted here in Utah.  The symptoms leading up to the need for surgery started a few years ago.  First, external rotation of my hip would cause a sharp pain in the join.  I also started favoring my other side which likely is why my Quadratus lumborum or QL muscle was injured at the IPL World Cup in 2016.  I also developed more low back pain as the hip was putting more pressure on the spin being unstable.  Last Spring of 2018 I started getting sharp pains that would make me collapse and scream in pain.  The pain was assumed to be the last of my labrum tearing in the narrow sockets.  Movement from that point was very painful where I would limp while causing more damage to the low back and the unstable socket would inevitably pinch my sciatica leading to more pain.

The spacing or lack off on the left is similar to my own joint.  THERE IS NONE.

Walking was almost unbearable  while sitting and standing both cause me pain.  My comfort pose was laying flat on my back with ice packs but it helped me get through the last few months leading up to the surgery.

My hip socket
Similar hardware in my hip now

Cryotherapy 411

1. Increased blood circulation: Whole Body Cryotherapy enriches the blood with elevated levels of oxygen and helps deliver vital nutrients all around the body. Insufficient oxygen levels in blood have been linked to increased proneness to illness and lowered immune system. In addition to consuming natural organic foods rich in calcium, iron and copper, cryosauna treatments will oxygenate your tissues, and help your blood to circulate at top speeds.
2. Boosted immune system:   As your blood circulation, oxygenation and nutrient levels improve, an intensive stimulation of the immune system will quickly follow, resulting in a preemptive corrective response. This, in turn, will promote the normalization of hormonal balance, making this one of the most important benefits of cryotherapy for sports and general wellness.
3.  Increased energy and strength: As the body goes into an alert mode boosting the immune system, one of the most commonly reported almost immediate benefits of cryotherapy for sports and fitness treatments experienced by many patients is an increase in energy level and consequent strength.
4.  Decreased fatigue: As you gain more energy and strength from your regular Whole Body Cryotherapy for sports and fitness treatment sessions, your will become less tired
5. Effective sports rehabilitation add-on treatment: While physiotherapy is typically a standard go-to rehabilitation treatment method for athletes’ sports injuries, more and more professional athletes turn to cryotherapy cold sauna or chamber for enhanced pain relief. With countless number of virtually risk-free benefits within the sporting field, cryotherapy for sports, both elite and amateur kinds, has become a prime candidate for athlete alternative rehabilitation programs. Cryotherapy for athletes is now the most popular add-on and post-performance treatment, and is frequently recommended in addition to physiotherapy sessions. In fact, entire teams of athletes use it. Luke Walton, Los Angeles Lakers forward,  stated that “It definitely works” (read the article below). All-Star pitcher C.J. Wilson of Texas Rangers confirmed that “It’s really legit”.
6. Effective pain management method:  While your skin cools off to about 10-12 degrees Celsius, your core body temperature remains mostly the same during the cryogenic chamber treatment, and only slightly dropped afterwards if at all. This short-term cold therapy stimulates the release of endorphins, which in turn trigger analgesia (immediate pain relief). Cryotherapy for pain management became a popular clinically-proven technique in 1970’s for rheumatoid diseases-related pain relief. And it has since been successfully used as a supplementary treatment method for many other health problems, including sports injuries and general muscle and joint pain and inflammations.
7. Faster sports injury recovery: Whole Body Cryotherapy in sports medicine has been getting a lot of attention from professional athletes due to its anti-inflammatory and pain relief benefits. Cryotherapy sports injuries treatments available at the Cryotherapy Health & Wellness inc. in Toronto reduce the injury recovery time by 1 to 2 days on average.
8. Improved concentration: You may be surprised to learn that your fitness performance maybe be correlated with your cognitive mental abilities, including concentration and memory. Better concentration keeps you focused on your sports and fitness goals, and makes you overall more productive. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, known as BDNF, related to the functioning of cognitive abilities, is responsible for protecting neuro-motors in the neuromuscular system from degradation. Degradation of neuro-motors, the most crucial element or the “ignition” in the “engine” of your muscle, partially explains age-related muscle atrophy.  As your brain gets oxygenated via increased blood circulation following your Whole Body Cryotherapy for sports and fitness treatment sessions, your BDNF improves, which, in turn, positively affects your concentration and enhances physical performance.
9. Improved sleep patterns and insomnia:  Poor sleep compromises the production of melatonin, suppresses your immune system, and leads to insulin resistance. Insomnia or inconsistent sleep patterns may directly contribute to the development of a number of serious health issues, from digestive, weight-related and mental health problems to infections and even cancer and diabetes. Prostate cancer in men and breast cancer in women have been studied and linked to poor sleep patterns. Find out how cryo treatments benefit mental health here.
10. General wellness: With your immune system boosted, blood circulation, concentration and night sleep improved,  your natural treatment via Whole Body Cryotherapy results in reduced recurrence of colds, flu, and seasonal allergic reactions. These, in turn, will help enhance your sports and fitness performance. Many also report noticeable improvements in psychological stress, muscle and joint pain, and even skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis.

Exercise allows you to age optimally

Staying active allows you to age optimally, according to a study by King’s College London and the University of Birmingham. The study of amateur older cyclists found that many had levels of physiological function that would place them at a much younger age compared to the general population; debunking the common assumption that aging automatically makes you more frail.


The study, published in The Journal of Physiology, recruited 84 male and 41 female cycling enthusiasts aged 55 to 79 to explore how the aging process affects the human body, and whether specific physiological markers can be used to determine your age.
Cyclists were recruited to exclude the effects of a sedentary lifestyle, which can aggravate health problems and cause changes in the body, which might appear to be due to the aging process. Men and women had to be able to cycle 100 km in under 6.5 hours and 60 km in 5.5 hours, respectively, to be included in the study. Smokers, heavy drinkers and those with high blood pressure or other health conditions were excluded from the study.
Participants underwent two days of laboratory testing at King’s. For each participant, a physiological profile was established which included measures of cardiovascular, respiratory, neuromuscular, metabolic, endocrine and cognitive functions, bone strength, and health and well-being. Volunteers’ reflexes, muscle strength, oxygen uptake during exercise and peak explosive cycling power were determined.
The results of the study showed that in these individuals, the effects of aging were far from obvious. Indeed, people of different ages could have similar levels of function such as muscle strength, lung power and exercise capacity. The maximum rate of oxygen consumption showed the closest association with age, but even this marker could not identify with any degree of accuracy the age of any given individual, which would be the requirement for any useful biomarker of aging.
In a basic, but important test of function in older people, the time taken to stand from a chair, walk three metres, turn, walk back and sit down was also measured. Taking more than 15 seconds to complete the task generally indicates a high risk of falling. Even the oldest participants in the present study fell well below these levels, fitting well within the norm for healthy young adults.
Overall, the study concluded that aging is likely to be a highly individualist phenomenon. As people are so different, the team concluded that more studies are needed which follow the same healthy and exercising individuals over time to better understand the effects of aging the body.
Dr Ross Pollock, lead author of the paper from King’s College London, said: “An essential part of our study was deciding which volunteers should be selected to explore the effects of aging. The main problem facing health research is that in modern societies the majority of the population is inactive. A sedentary lifestyle causes physiological problems at any age. Hence the confusion as to how much the decline in bodily functions is due to the natural aging process and how much is due to the combined effects of aging and inactivity.”
“In many models of aging lifespan is the primary measure, but in human beings this is arguably less important than the consequences of deterioration in health. Healthy life expectancy — our healthspan — is not keeping pace with the average lifespan, and the years we spend with poor health and disabilities in old age are growing.”
Professor Stephen Harridge, senior author and Director of the Centre of Human & Aerospace Physiological Sciences at King’s College London where the study took place, said: “Because most of the population is largely sedentary, the tendency is to assume that inactivity is the inevitable condition for humans. However, given that our genetic inheritance stems from a period when high levels of physical activity were the likely norm, being physically active should be considered to play an essential role in maintaining health and wellbeing throughout life.”
Emeritus Professor Norman Lazarus, a member of the King’s team and also a cyclist, said: “Inevitably, our bodies will experience some decline with age, but staying physically active can buy you extra years of function compared to sedentary people. Cycling not only keeps you mentally alert, but requires the vigorous use of many of the body’s key systems, such as your muscles, heart and lungs which you need for maintaining health and for reducing the risks associated with numerous diseases.”
Story Source:
The above story is based on materials provided by King’s College LondonNote: Materials may be edited for content and length.